The Eulogy: Biography and Spiritual Legacy

The challenge of writing a eulogy, especially for someone who I have never met, is to capture the essence of a person’s entire life within the confines of two or three pages. I happen to fancy compact formats as I like to get straight to the heart of a matter. (Thus I am quite comfortable with Twitter.) The beauty of a eulogy as a genre is that I can start with an image of the deceased and then go on to make some comment that I hope will assist the mourners in their grieving, or give all present an increased understanding of what the deceased has taught us about our own lives.

As with much of my hospice work, my eulogies do not dwell on the person’s closing days, but on their life story. I quote a eulogy I wrote last year concerning a piano player:

“The classical composer Franz Schubert declared, ‘I am in the world only for the purpose of composing.’ To paraphrase this for Professor Lekowski [not his real name], he might have thought, ‘I am in the world only for the purpose of sharing music.’ From start to finish, bringing light classical music alive to his listeners was what he did. Growing up in a shtetl in the Ukraine, I can imagine him catching scraps of folk tunes here and there, just enough to cause him to yearn for more…..As an adult, he gave audiences pure pleasure as he played medleys of Jewish tunes, musical themes from movies, Italian songs and many other kinds of light classical pieces. He played in venues as local as a day care center with seniors singing along, and as imposing and formal as a concert hall, the chords lifting everyone up no matter where he went. Music meant so much to him that he said, ‘the moment I stop playing, I will die…’”

“Music is a form of communication. When used for good, it is a way of connecting with others, and that is what lends it its beauty and power and meaning. Perhaps the professor’s legacy for us is to find and develop our own ways of sublime communication, be it making it possible for persons to grow emotionally; be it the intellectual stimulation of talking on a topic one knows thoroughly; be it empowering others by showing them how to fix something; be it bringing serenity to a loved one by taking him to a natural scene filled with the quiet of subdued colors and the rustling of little animals and the fresh smell of the wind. Let us pay tribute to Leo Lekowski’s memory by taking what we are passionate about and allowing others to share in its pleasures as well. May his memory be for a blessing.”

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2 thoughts on “The Eulogy: Biography and Spiritual Legacy

  1. A moving eulogy, Karen. I like your idea of encouraging us to share what we feel passionate about. A pity you do not live in the UK so that we could call on your services when necessary.

    Like

    • May necessity for anyone offering such services to you be a very long way off! This reminds me of an old joke about not agreeing to a contract to serve a congregation unless they give 6 months notice for funerals. In that case, this might work out all the way to the UK, eh?

      Like

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