Telling It Like It Was In Castro’s Cuba

In my last post I wrote that relating to others as a chaplain is like performing improvisational theater. I go into each encounter with a patient with no script in mind, and what they say shapes the give and take between us. But the flavor of interactions at hospice varies so much, I get to sample a number of careers, not just one. Sometimes I feel like a detective, following up hints my clients inadvertently drop which point to hidden deeper concerns that they feel too hesitant to express outright to a total stranger.  Other times I feel like a journalist, gathering stories of public interest. Besides “getting the story,” when I act like a reporter, I am giving the client in such cases the freedom to tell their story and fulfill their need to be heard and understood. Many of the anecdotes in Offbeatcompassion derive from this journalistic role.

Thinking back, there was a storyteller who was so anxious to have me listen in detail I think she wanted me to publicize her words so that more Americans would know what it was really like in the early years of Castro’s Cuba, in the early 60’s. I was genuinely surprised to hear such tales of woe and bravery. Like any reliable reporter, I “checked my sources” on the Internet and found that others have told similar stories.

I will call the narrator “Juana”, who spoke to me for over two hours while her loved one lay sleeping under a portrait of a friend who served in the Cuban Army prior to Castro. “My family was on the ‘losing side’, and they called the people on the losing side ‘worms,’” she explained.  As Juana spoke, these sorts of details reminded me of Nazi behavior. She went on, “The people did so-called volunteer work in the cane fields. Very hard labor they would ask people to do on their time off. But I did not do it.” Instead she went to study at a medical school, hoping to find a niche in Castro’s Cuba where she could do something productive and avoid some of the worst consequences of his regime.

But even there she felt society had become so warped that she could no longer find a viable place to fit in. She said, “the school had ‘cleansing meetings,’ where in front of all the students they would say which students they were going to expel. And then one time I heard a shot and later I found out a student had shot himself after learning that his girlfriend was expelled.” This gruesome story reminds me of the recent science fiction thriller movie The Thinning, whose equally gruesome premise is that those who fail a school aptitude test are executed in order to ensure population control.

One other significant anecdote she shared was about the U.S. Naval base in Guantanamo Bay. I have always thought of the part of Guantanamo Bay which serves as a prison, but Juana explained that Cubans would try to climb over the fence to be on U.S. soil and gain their freedom. Some Cubans eventually were allowed to go from there to the U.S. Juana told of one exploit where the escapees practiced going over a similar fence elsewhere before they went on a train that passed very close to the naval base fence. “The conductor had a plan in advance, these people went on the train on a particular day from all over Cuba; from many provinces. The conductor stopped the train real close to the fence. Not the usual stop. He opened the doors and the people all dashed out and rushed over to the fence. Many climbed up but the guards up on the towers shot at them and some were hit and killed. But a lot of the people made it. They made it to freedom.”

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