Book Review: Words At The Threshold: What We Say As We’re Nearing Death

With all of the years of chaplain experience that I have, rare is the book about dying that raises my awareness of how to do my job better. The author Lisa Smartt is a linguist and the essence of the whole book is that the talk of persons who are going to die relatively soon, from a few hours to a few weeks, reflects “consistent patterns that emerge in language at the end of life.” Her data consist of 1,500 English utterances gathered over a period of four years. Some of the patterns she found include paradoxical statements such as, “I understood everything everyone said, but not a word was spoken,” metaphors such as “Yellow bus…lots of angels are driving that bus,” or visions such as seeing ancestors or spiritual figures.

After I read Smartt’s numerous categories and examples, I started to notice this special pre-death talk more often while doing my own hospice work. I then found myself responding to this special way of talking in a much more tuned-in manner than before, letting myself explore what the person was trying to convey. Just the other day a gentleman who only leaves his room in a recliner to relax in the sunroom informed me, “I have to go to a meeting.” I asked, “What is the meeting about?” (Other staff might have tried to “reorient” him by saying there was no meeting he had to attend.) He said, the meeting “is about everything.” I echoed, “Everything?” and then reflected, “That’s going to be a really really long meeting.” Chuckling, he agreed with that. I thought to myself, he might have been referring to what professionals call “life review,” i.e. the kind of run-through of our life story that some people do during the period of time before the very end as well as at other key moments of their lives.

Another characteristic this book includes is intensified language, or what I would call heightened sensitivity. I will never forget the time a patient said to me, hours before dying, that the water I gave her “was the most delicious thing I have ever tasted.”

If you find these examples engaging or touching, you will find anecdote after anecdote in Words At The Threshold, some of which are very poignant. One is about a woman who kept referring to five boxes she had to organize. Her daughter thought maybe the boxes stood for her and her four siblings, and at that her mother got agitated and exclaimed, “I need to find a place for them!”  She did not calm down when her daughter mentioned where each one of them lived.  Finally when the daughter said to her mother she could keep them in her heart, she became calm and relieved. A lesson here for all of us who may in our personal or professional lives be with someone talking near the end, is to not be too literal and instead get at deeper things such as love and other values.

Besides sensitizing me how to better connect with patients when they engage in “threshold talk”, this book also teaches me to recognize it as an indicator that patients may be nearing the end. So many times, as families struggle with uncertainty, they ask me how long their loved one has. Not even nurses always get this right, and we do not want to increase anyone’s distress by guessing wrong. Especially way wrong. But at least threshold talk can be a guide, and I can let families know that not a whole lot of time may be left. Another benefit of this book is that it  shows us how to make the most of a loved one’s end-of-life talk, for example by keeping a journal of all of the utterances to look for patterns of meaning among them, and by thinking of conversing with them as if we were learning a new language in a new land.

My only caveat is that at times, Lisa Smartt thinks that threshold talk hints at an afterlife, partly because the language is like what people who have had near-death experiences use. She thinks of these people as having died and returned, and that the similar language they use is suggestive of consciousness after death. But one could reason the reverse: that since people use such language on other occasions that do not have to do with their actual final death, that this disproves anything about threshold talk pointing to the existence of an afterlife, as comforting and moving as that would be. The author is a poet as well as a linguist, and so I take her comments about consciousness after death in that spirit.

2 thoughts on “Book Review: Words At The Threshold: What We Say As We’re Nearing Death

  1. Sande Ramage says:

    Sounds like an interesting book. But what struck me as I read your post was the idea that perhaps people at end of life are relieved of the extraneous burdens that pin us down in the craziness that we all endure as everyday life in our time. What if the way they talked was pointing to how we could all live if life was rearranged differently and there was space and time to enter into and value each interaction and experience.

    Like

    • Yes, and as with our experiences with facing the death of loved ones or even of people we don’t know but hear about, Smartt’s anecdotes remind us to extend the appreciation of our lives to a longer and longer time before our deaths rather than wait to savor life when it is practically too late. Ready, get set, start now!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.