Film Review: The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

Although this provocative and fascinating film is “old news” having come out in 2008, I heartily recommend it for its timeless themes. This fantasy captivates me because it challenges assumptions about youth and old age so much that I was tempted to title this post, “The Elixir of Old Age”. The movie is about an individual born in his eighties, found abandoned on the porch of a nursing home who then gets younger instead of older as time passes. At first this sounds marvelous: why not get over all the bad stuff like arthritis and forgetfulness and baggy eyes in the beginning and have things get better and better, not only physically, but spiritually? There we would be, with the wisdom of our mature brains reflecting how we could make better use of those years of being in top shape and be attuned to appreciating them more once we reach them. Sure enough, as Benjamin becomes younger, he luxuriates in being able to do more things. He abandons the wheelchair. He then abandons one crutch, then the other. He enjoys getting a job on a ship because it is fun to be doing things “and even getting paid for it.” But life gets very complicated as he forms various bonds, including romantic ones…..But in case you have not seen the film, I won’t say much more about that part of the story save that what happens is not hackneyed but also most insightful.

But picture how getting younger would actually work out.  If we were to grow younger, and the ones we love grow older, we would have less and less in common with them. We would have less and less to share with them and we would literally be growing further and further apart. Just think of how it would accelerate or mutate the changing roles in our relationships, especially across the generations. Say my 13-year-old niece gets married in thirty years, would I want to be around her age at the time? When they have their 10th anniversary, how would I relate to them as a much younger person? The feelings of loss we all experience arise at least in part from the loss of connection we have with others, and being out of temporal sync would be another spur to such loss.

This film made me think about how glad I am to be growing old along with my husband, other family, and friends. We are increasing and deepening rather than decreasing our connections in so many ways. We have a growing stock of shared experiences, challenges, and insights. We have a shared understanding of what it is like to be older, and therefore can empathize with the limitations that others face. As he “younged,” Benjamin Button found himself even cutting off relationships he was doing well in, because he feared the consequences of eventually having to be taken care of as well as being cared about. The darkest side of becoming younger became painfully clear to him as he wandered about as a teenager for many years with virtually no connection with others at all.  This is as close to a living death that one can get. Although some of our loved ones including ourselves may have to be cared for, I see in a vast majority of cases, the people involved continue relating to each other on whatever level that may be. Unlike Benjamin, I rarely witness the caregiver nor care receiver completely cutting themselves off from each other except of course due to certain diseases or other extreme matters.

Whatever our circumstances, I rejoice in the ever deepening connections I have with people I have known, as well as the increased quantity of connections with new people I meet. Our stories get longer and filled with recurrent themes as we journey in step. Benjamin ends up as a baby…with no memories… at last closing his eyes, uninitiated.

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